Title VII of the Civic rights act of 1964 is a confederate law which restrains employers from discriminating their employees and job applicants based on classes such as sex, origin, race, color, and religion in employment-related issues (Grimsley, 2018).

Equal Employment Opportunity
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Equal Employment Opportunity.
Title VII of the Civic rights act of 1964 is a confederate law which restrains employers from discriminating their employees and job applicants based on classes such as sex, origin, race, color, and religion in employment-related issues (Grimsley, 2018). Title VII forbids discrimination which might be based on employment aspects such as job transfers, job promotions, advertisements, recruitments, fringe benefits, apprenticeship programs, payments, retirement plans, hiring, firing, utilization of company facilities, training, disabilities, leaves, layoffs, recalls, compensations, and employee classification (Grimsley, 2018). The law mainly applies to employers who have fifteen or more employees and it includes local, federal and state governments. It also involves public and private institutions of higher learning, employment agencies, and labor organizations.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency formed through the Title VII Civil Rights Act of 1964 with an aim of the interpretation and enforcement of confederate laws that restrain discrimination (Grimsley, 2018). In order to achieve its set purpose, EEOC offers equal employment opportunity regulations for federal government employees, issues guidelines of law interpretation, and processes discrimination cases. EEOC also receives discrimination charges from employees, investigates them, and strives to intercede for settlements between employers and their employees.
If an employee or job applicant believes that they possess a Title VII claim, they have a right to register a discrimination complaint with the EEOC. In order to preserve one’s legal rights, the individual needs to file the charge in a period within a period of six months starting from the day on which the discrimination offense takes place (AAUW, 2018). If either a state agency or local agency executes a law that forbids employment discrimination on a similar basis, the deadline is increased to a period of three hundred calendar days (AAUW, 2018). One does not necessarily require an attorney in order to file a complaint with EEOC since the official website of EEOC provides relevant instructions that are necessary for filing charges.

References
AAUW. (2018). Know Your Rights: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Retrieved from AAUW: https://www.aauw.org/what-we-do/legal-resources/know-your-rights-at-work/title-vii/
Grimsley, S. (2018). Equal Employment Opportunity: Title VII Law & Regulations. Retrieved from Study.com: https://study.com/academy/lesson/equal-employment-opportunity-title-vii-law-regulations.html