Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major depressive disorder that occurs up to one year after birth (Hackley & Kriebs, 2017).

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Question 1—Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major depressive disorder that occurs up to one year after birth (Hackley & Kriebs, 2017). Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major depressive disorder that occurs up to one year after birth (Hackley & Kriebs, 2017).Common symptoms of postpartum depression include: anhedonia; sleep disturbance; feelings of loneliness, isolation, or guilt; poor concentration; anxiety; and somatic complaints (Hackley & Kriebs, 2017). Mothers with postpartum depression are also less responsive to their infants and often need help caring for their infant (Hackley & Kriebs, 2017). Studies have shown that postpartum depression can impact child development, behaviors in childhood, and children’s cognitive function (Hackley & Kriebs, 2017).

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is the screening tool used at my preceptor’s clinic to assess for postpartum depression. Hackley and Kriebs (2017) state that because postpartum depression has bimodal peaks at 2 and 6 months, the optimal time to screen for postpartum depression is between 2 weeks and 6 months postpartum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends screening at the patient’s 6-week comprehensive postpartum visit (ACOG, 2018). However, because postpartum depression can occur at any time, studies and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) are now supporting the use of EPDS screenings for mothers at the 2 month, 4 month, and 6 month well child visits (Emerson, Mathews, & Struwe, 2018).