Focusing on the factors of age and gender and the effects on the experience of pain showed the importance of understanding different factors relating to pain. Persistent pain affects the elderly disproportionally, occurring in 50 % of elderly community-dwelling patients and 80 % of aged care residents (Veal & Peterson, 2015). In the United

 

Focusing on the factors of age and gender and the effects on the experience of pain showed the importance of understanding different factors relating to pain. Persistent pain affects the elderly disproportionally, occurring in 50 % of elderly community-dwelling patients and 80 % of aged care residents (Veal & Peterson, 2015). In the United States, the fastest growing population is the baby boomers generation, and in ten years they will represent one out of five citizens. Pain is also increasingly difficult to manage in the elderly patient population as drug interactions, absorption rates and drug clearances begin varying as a result of the aging process. With the opportunity of placing a high fall risk population in even more danger, dosing for the elderly population can become difficult for a  practitioner. Petrini, Matthiesen, and Arendt-Nielsen (2015) acknowledged that the experience of pain in the elderly may differ from the experience in younger populations on multiple dimensions (sensory, affective, and cognitive). As the body physically wears down, so does the nervous system. In many patients seeking pain relief, the number of neurotransmitter cell receptors decreases with age-associated cortical and subcortical atrophy of brain tissue (Kaye et al., 2014). The practitioner must take into account all of the aging population’s comorbidities plus, fully assess the patient to determine if they are accurately representing their pain description.