Employees are required to make ethical decisions and protect the  interests of the company. They must act with honesty and fairness.  Employees are required to report any unethical behavior to a senior  manager or the human resources department. Employees have a duty of  loyalty to the company and should act in the best interest of the  company.

Guidelines for acceptable behavior

Employees are required to make ethical decisions and protect the  interests of the company. They must act with honesty and fairness.  Employees are required to report any unethical behavior to a senior  manager or the human resources department. Employees have a duty of  loyalty to the company and should act in the best interest of the  company.

Compliance with legislation

Company employees are required to observe all laws and regulations.  If there are contradictory or stricter laws than what the company has in  place, employees must comply with the laws and regulations. Employees  may not falsify information on forms or records. Employees are required  to report information and comply with litigation requests, complaints,  and inquiries.

Examples of prohibited acts

Company employees shall not request or accept gifts, loans, or  payments for themselves or others if it is meant to influence their  duties or decisions. Employees shall not use confidential information  for the private gain of the employee or any other person.

Company employees may not harass, invade the privacy of, intimidate,  or interfere with another employee in a manner that is offensive.  Employees may not engage in unprofessional behavior with other employees  or customers. Employees may not engage in negligent or deliberate  destruction or cause damage to the company’s property.

References:

Gonzalez-Padron, T. (2015). Business ethics and social responsibility for managers [Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/

Snyder, J., Johnston, R., Rory, C, Valorie M., Morgan, J., Adams, K.  (2017, June). How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care:  Four Patterns from the Canadian Context. Health Care Analysis, 25(2), 138-150.