Death punishment is a sanction by the authorities where the states terminate person‘s life as punishment for a crime. The death penalty also known as capital punishment has been used to solve capital crimes, in the traditional and modern society. The penalty has been used since time immemorial until the rise of retention activism in the 19th century (Hans et al 2015).

Death penalty
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Introduction
Death punishment is a sanction by the authorities where the states terminate person‘s life as punishment for a crime. The death penalty also known as capital punishment has been used to solve capital crimes, in the traditional and modern society. The penalty has been used since time immemorial until the rise of retention activism in the 19th century (Hans et al 2015).
Reasons for the arguments for and against the death penalty have been based on knowledge about the human rights-right to live, common laws and instinct, mainly based on religions and cultures and the agenda of co-existence amongst the human race. One can, therefore, base his argument against the death penalty on the above elements of the law. Losing right to live-death penalty is against this basic human right that is advocated for by every human right commission active today. Right to live should not be based on any conditionality whatsoever. Sundby (2015) strongly argues against termination of life and proposes other forms of punishment that can equally solve the matter. Retentionists and abolitionists have engaged in this debate with passion based on complexities and may be controversies but anyway, this trickles down to social justice and civilization as a characteristic of any ‘improving’ society. Everybody deserves a second chance.
A second chance comes with a room for rehabilitation, changed mindset as a result of correction. Measures in the penitentiary, however, may need time away from the society and in correctional facilities. Imprisonment can change the convict to be not only better person but also resourceful to the society. This is where capital punishment fails in its attempt to solve the societal problem. Louisiana state penitentiary report, (Canes-Wrone, Clark, & Kelly, 2014). In its finding explains how many who came in as very hard criminals came out of prison reformed, productive and better the law is established to allow for the conducive coexistence of humanity, but when the punishment is by death this leads to contradiction to this prime agenda of the law. The sentence can be wrongly decided and in case there is a need for an appeal. There will be no room for reversed justice. This means the justice will not have prevailed the other reason for being against this is based on the societal rule of law.
Nobody is above the law and therefore no one can execute the termination of life, execution of the order is against the society’s fabricating values. Law is basically based on this reasoning what if everybody commits it in the world then everybody suffers the consequence-death. From his reasoning one can see how ineffective and its inability to correct the order however, those who advocate for this penalty argues that more are being concentrated in jails, most of these criminals don’t change anyway, and that means waste of taxpayer’s money given that they won’t change no matter the amount of time they spend in penitentiary (Sundby, 2015). Religions such as Jews, Islam advocates death as a punishment for some capital crime and even civil crimes such as a prostitution; the problem with this is that it is biased to gender, for example. The death penalty makes less privileged feel more helpless due to the fact that they are handicapped when it comes to legal representation.
In conclusion, despite all the above pros of death penalty, I strongly oppose the death penalty on the basis of upholding human dignity and advocacy for human rights.

REFERENCES
Canes-Wrone, B., Clark, T. S., & Kelly, J. P. (2014). Judicial selection and death penalty decisions. American Political Science Review, 108(1), 23-39.
Hans, V. P., Blume, J. H., Eisenberg, T., Hritz, A. C., Johnson, S. L., Royer, C. E., & Wells, M. T. (2015). The Death Penalty: Should the Judge or the Jury Decide Who Dies?. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 12(1), 70-99.
Sundby, S. E. (2015). A life and death decision: A jury weighs the death penalty. St. Martin’s Press.