D. Conclusion Make a conclusion based upon your analysis.  Be sure that your conclusion is logically supported by your analysis (There is no need to repeat what you have already said in the Application. The best Conclusion is a one word answer to the question raised in the Issue – yes or no.)

D. Conclusion Make a conclusion based upon your analysis.  Be sure that your conclusion is logically supported by your analysis (There is no need to repeat what you have already said in the Application. The best Conclusion is a one word answer to the question raised in the Issue – yes or no.)

 

Each legal analysis should shortly discuss and match the given case with the related theory and provide answers to the questions asked at the end of the case

 IRAC format means: I-what is the main issue of the case? discuss; R-reasoning: why would you solve the case the way you have provided, what are the answers to the questions asked; A-analysis; C-conclusion: wrap up main knowledge learnt from this case

The article “Young Writer With a Following Admits Fabricating Dylan Quotes in Book” describes the situation of Jonah Lehrer, a writer who violated expectations regarding the integrity of his work.

Expectations for writers can vary from one context to another. In WRTG 112, we have been studying how to use sources in a research paper. In this discussion, we will explore how the expectations for college research writing are similar and/or different from expectations in other writing contexts.

Respond to the following in 1-2 paragraphs.

  1. Summarize the expectations for use of sources in a college research paper, as you understand them.
  2. In what ways are these expectations similar to or different from expectations you have observed in other contexts, such as workplace, personal, or journalistic writing? You might use observations from your reading about Jonah Lehrer in addition to personal experience in your response.