Both of these leaders made a decision, as descried in chapter 7 of the course text, to be influential leaders. They both genuinely care about the staff and maintain a level of credibility among staff that provides them with a high level of respect from their employees. Being a leader is a selfless endeavor, and the best leaders aim to improve the lives of others not to improve their own status (Mashall & Broome, 2017).  

A type of Transformational Leadership, known as inspirational, has been shown to be the one of the most effective in producing outcomes and a happy and healthy work environment. The Inspirational leader sets organizational goals and although he or she has high expectations of his or her employees, the leader is supportive and positive (Zindeldin, 2017). I found this type of leadership a key factor in good leadership because I feel it makes the organization feel like they are working as a team to achieve the same goal.

An example of this was my manager when I worked on Labor and Delivery. Our Nurse Manager was this type of manager and ran a very effective team. Each nurse meeting was organized to develop a team goal to improve patient safety. Sometimes this meant improving medication error rates or decreasing the call to cut time for a cesarean section. Not only did she give us helpful ideas on how to improve, she would spend time on the floor, working with us, taking care of patients. This gave her to opportunity to see what was hindering the goal, and to see what could be improved in way of policy that would help us meet that goal. We felt supported and felt that our manager truly cared for each of us.

Both of these leaders made a decision, as descried in chapter 7 of the course text, to be influential leaders. They both genuinely care about the staff and maintain a level of credibility among staff that provides them with a high level of respect from their employees. Being a leader is a selfless endeavor, and the best leaders aim to improve the lives of others not to improve their own status (Mashall & Broome, 2017).

References

Aryati, A. S., Sudiro, A., Hadiwidjaja, D., & Noermijati, N. (2018). The influence of ethical leadership to deviant workplace behavior mediated by ethical climate and organizational commitment. International Journal of Law & Management, 60(2), 233–249. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1108/IJLMA-03-2017-0053

Marshall, E., & Broome, M. (2017). Transformational leadership in nursing: From expert clinician to influential leader (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer.

Zineldin, M. (2017). Transformational leadership behavior, emotions, and outcomes: Health psychology perspective in the workplace. Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health, 32(1), 14–25. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1080/15555240.2016.1273782