2. Compare and contrast these London-based bands: The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds, The Animals, and The Spencer Davis Group. What are their similarities? What are their differences?

Choose ONE topic.  100 WORDS MAXIMUM.

1. The Beatles’ performance on the Ed Sullivan Show is considered to be one of the “most storied in rock”. Why? What circumstances and twists of fate allowed this to happen? Do you think that it is possible to happen again?

2. Compare and contrast these London-based bands: The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds, The Animals, and The Spencer Davis Group. What are their similarities? What are their differences?

3. Early in their career, The Who had been labeled a “mod” band, putting them into a category as part of rival gang warfare between Mods and Rockers. Compare that to contemporary groups and artists whose music often is shadowed in gang warfare. Is it fair to judge them due to the circumstances?

The Burmese sub-inspector and some Indian constables were waiting for me in the quarter where the elephant had been seen. It was a very poor quarter, a labyrinth of squalid bamboo huts, thatched with palmleaf, winding all over a steep hillside. I remember that it was a cloudy, stuffy morning at the beginning of the rains. We began questioning the people as to where the elephant had gone and, as usual, failed to get any definite information. That is invariably the case in the East; a story always sounds clear enough at a distance, but the nearer you get to the scene of events the vaguer it becomes. Some of the people said that the elephant had gone in one direction, some said that he had gone in another, some professed not even to have heard of any elephant. I had almost made up my mind that the whole story was a pack of lies, when we heard yells a little distance away. There was a loud, scandalized cry of “Go away, child! Go away this instant!” and an old woman with a switch in her hand came round the corner of a hut, violently shooing away a crowd of naked children. Some more women followed, clicking their tongues and exclaiming; evidently there was something that the children ought not to have seen. I rounded the hut and saw a man’s dead body sprawling in the mud. He was an Indian, a black Dravidian coolie, almost naked, and he could not have been dead many minutes. The people said that the elephant had come suddenly upon him round the corner of the hut, caught him with its trunk, put its foot on his back and ground him into the earth. This was the rainy season and the ground was soft, and his face had scored a trench a foot deep and a couple of yards long. He was lying on his belly with arms crucified and head sharply twisted to one side. His face was coated with mud, the eyes wide open, the teeth bared and grinning with an expression of unendurable agony. (Never tell me, by the way, that the dead look peaceful. Most of the corpses I have seen looked devilish.) The friction of the great beast’s foot had stripped the skin from his back as neatly as one skins a rabbit. As soon as I saw the dead man I sent an orderly to a friend’s house nearby to borrow an elephant rifle. I had already sent back the pony, not wanting it to go mad with fright and throw me if it smelt the elephant.